Interview With Bob Garon & Anthony McClellan Part 4

I hope you've been enjoying the series we've been having on the nutrition in my audio interview with Anthony McClellan. I'd like to hear from you and what you've thought in the comment section below.

Here's Part 4 for you and this is a very good part too. Well they've all been good, but that's just my very biased opinion and that's okay. In this part we talk about cholesterol and some of the myths regarding eating fat makes you fat. Truth: It doesn't. You don't get fat from eating fat. In fact it's the exact opposite.


Listen to the rest of our interview for more. You'll hear how we may have found the chicken that laid the yolk-less egg and how my favorite cow is the brown cow... producing chocolate milk. :)

http://www.mevio.com/widgets/mwm/MevioWM.swf

Q. Does it harm raw eggs to scramble them or cook them? Does it oxidize the cholesterol?
A. No at all. The whites should mostly be eaten cooked, as raw egg whites contain enzyme inhibitors that can cause digestive problems. Oxidation only occurs during commercial processing when the eggs are forced out of a tiny hole at high temperatures and pressure.

Q. I am confused because my farmer feeds grains to chickens; is that okay?
A. Cows and sheep are ruminants and should get mostly grass.  But chickens and turkeys have to get grain or they won't grow right or lay enough eggs.  We wish farmers wouldn't give soy because the isoflavones do end up in the egg yolks and the fat.  Unfortunately, most farmers doing pasture feeding are giving soy to their chickens.

Egg White Eating Can Create A Biotin Deficiency
Although biotin deficiency is very rare, the human requirement for dietary biotin has been demonstrated in two different situations: prolonged intravenous feeding without biotin supplementation and consumption of raw egg white for a prolonged period (many weeks to years). Avidin is a protein found in egg white, which binds biotin and prevents its absorption. Cooking egg white denatures avidin, rendering it susceptible to digestion, and unable to prevent the absorption of dietary biotin

Sources:
1. http://www.westonaprice.org/faq.html
2. http://www.oralchelation.com/ingred/biotin.htm#ref7

In case you missed Parts 1, 2, & 3 be sure to listen to them.

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3 

And I'd love to hear your thoughts and comments. Please leave some below. Thanks!